Royal Irish Constabulary
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FIREARMS OF THE ROYAL IRISH CONSTABULARY

The British Webley and Scott (including Royal Irish Constabulary) Revolvers
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The Webley Revolver (also known as the Webley Break-Top Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various marks, the standard issue service pistol for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, the British Empire, and the Commonwealth from 1887 until 1963.

The Webley is a top-break revolver with automatic extraction. That is, breaking the revolver open for reloading also operates the extractor. This removes the spent cartridges from the cylinder. The Webley Mk I service revolver was adopted in 1887. A later version, the Mk IV, rose to prominence during the Boer War of 1899–1902. However, the Mk VI, introduced in 1915 during the First World War, is perhaps the best-known model.

Firing the large .455 Webley cartridge, Webley service revolvers are among the most powerful top-break revolvers ever produced. Although the .455 calibre Webley is no longer in military service, the .38/200 Webley Mk IV variant is still in use as a police sidearm in a number of countries.

Webley and Scott

produced a range of revolvers from the late 19th to late 20th centuries. Early models such as the Webley-Green army model 1879 and the Webley-Pryse model were first made during the 1870s. The best-known are the range of military revolvers, which were in service use across two World Wars and numerous colonial conflicts, but Webley & Scott also produced a number of short-barrel solid-frame revolvers, including the Webley RIC (Royal Irish Constabulary) model and the British Bulldog revolver, designed to be carried in a coat pocket for self-defence.
Webley WG (a.k.a. Webley Green) Revolver cal 455/476 (.476 Enfield)

The Webley revolver went through a number of changes, culminating in the Mk VI, which was in production between 1915 and 1923. The large .455 Webly revolvers were retired in 1947, although the Webley Mk IV .38/200 remained in service until 1963 alongside the Enfield No. 2 Mk I revolver. Commercial versions of all Webley service revolvers were also sold to the civilian market, along with a number of similar designs (such as the Webley-Government and Webley-Wilkinson) that were not officially adopted for service, but were nonetheless purchased privately by military officers.

MUSEUMS

There are many original RIC revolvers, badges & insignia, uniforms, etc located & on permanent display in museums throughout ireland.
These are also of course accompanied by numerous other period Republican exhibits of the old IRA usually mainly from the 1916 -1923 war of independence/civil war era & these exhibits are always well worth a visit.

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Webley Royal Irish Constabulary Revolver Cal 450 CF
A Webley Mark I Revolver, circa 1887, from Canada, cal .455 (Mk I) Webley
Webley Mk VI Revolver

British Webley and Scott
(including Royal Irish Constabulary) Revolvers